Friday, January 12, 2007

stricken like a filament

hold your horses you rainbow flower you!

Deny yourself an eviction and you'll stay right where you are, unless it isn't what you wanted. Tell a story, tell it twice, now say it again, and then once more. And again. And once more. Repeat.

I don't know anything. That's a great starting point. It isn't altogether true, however, since I do appear to know how to blog, spell, write, breathe and eat.

Sordid is the did is the title of a post either here in this blog or in some other place online. It doesn't really mean anything unless you interpret it to mean something in which case it means what you want it to mean.

A soporific causes somnolence.

If you combine the sound a sick dog makes with the sound a sick cat makes, does it sound the same as a sick pig?

I'm not at all surprised by something that surprises no one.

One of the most exciting things about today is that it is the very first January 12th, 2007 I have and anyone has ever experienced. That Deb has experienced it before me and I started experiencing it before Phx is irrelevant. One of the least exciting things about today is that it is a day that brings us all closer to death.

If you break a window, does that mean your PC won't work anymore?

6 comments:

ghost said...

"If you combine the sound a sick dog makes with the sound a sick cat makes, does it sound the same as a sick pig?"

no. it sounds like yiddish.

Brotha Buck said...

You really ought to write a book.

Debstar said...

Today is a great day Phil, just you wait and see.
At the risk of sounding stupid I had to look up soporific and somnolence in the dictionary. See I've learnt something new today.

Debstar said...

Hey Phil get this I've been thinking about soporific all day 'cause I was sure I'd heard it before and then it hit me. In Beatrice Potter's book (can't remember the title it's been a long long time since I read the book) Peter Rabbit & his bunny friends get into the farmers lettuce patch and eating all those lettuces had a soporific effect on the bunnies. I remember when I read it I thought what an unusual word to use in a child's book and I had to look it up then too. Yeah I thought that would impress you. ha ha ha

Phil Plasma said...

bb: would my book be a simple compendium of blog and other posts? Or would it be a fictional account of a bizarre writer living in an odd world? Or would it be a creative-inspirational collection of word-smith poetics?

Deb: I look up words pretty much everyday that I post or read posts, so don't feel that you are sounding stupid. I didn't know what soporific or somnolent meant at some point in my life, then I learned, and now, so have you. As for putting uncommon words in children's books, that is the best place for them since children's minds are such sponges.

moofruot said...

"As for putting uncommon words in children's books, that is the best place for them since children's minds are such sponges."

Exactly!

I learned the word "discombobulated" very early in life. I think that had a tremendous effect on how I developed.