Wednesday, July 23, 2008

baking cucumbers into a defensive methodology

Talking out loud is something my son doesn't quite yet understand. When I ask him to speak aloud rather than not speak, he interprets it to mean to speak loudly.

Creating havoc, is that the same as wreaking it? Clearly not:

wreak –verb (used with object)
1. to inflict or execute (punishment, vengeance, etc.): They wreaked havoc on the enemy.
2. to carry out the promptings of (one's rage, ill humor, will, desire, etc.), as on a victim or object: He wreaked his anger on the office staff.

Apart from the phrase 'wreaked havoc' has anyone ever used the verb 'to wreak' in any other circumstance? What is havoc, anyway?

havoc -noun; verb, -ocked, -ock·ing.
–noun 1. great destruction or devastation; ruinous damage.
–verb (used with object) 2. to work havoc upon; devastate.
–verb (used without object) 3. to work havoc: The fire havocked throughout the house.

How often is the word havoc used in it's verb form? Not very often, or so it seems to me.

2 comments:

handmaiden said...

Ack! Too many big words!

Debstar said...

Interesting. I'll have to think on that for awhile.

Would the sentence be: My daughter is wreaking havoc in her room or My daughter is havocing in her room. Maybe both are right. Her room looks like a bomb has hit it so one or the other applies.